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Kerb 27: Selective Perceptions reviewed in Landscape Australia

Kerb Reviews

Kerb 27: Selective Perceptions reviewed in Landscape Australia

Landscape Australia has reviewed Kerb 27: Selective Perceptions, locating the journal within the context of 2019 – a year of protesting against the impacts of consolidated power and wealth – as well as the literature on the social agency of landscape architects, and the profession itself. As Andrew Toland summarises of Kerb 27: What all contributions, as well as the editorial position, share is an unheroic and unsentimental awareness of the complexity and complications of designers’ roles in the production of overtly and covertly political space: positions that are not unproblematically “great” or “good,” are sometimes progressive, sometimes complicit, sometimes...

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Forthcoming title Rogue: Art of a Garden featured on The Planthunter

Reviews

Forthcoming title <i>Rogue: Art of a Garden</i> featured on The Planthunter

Musk Cottage garden is maverick designer Rick Eckersley’s own private garden. It is the culmination of decades of experimentation in Australian landscape gardening and an emphatic expression of the loose, almost painterly approach to landscape design that Eckersley is renowned for. Rogue: Art of a Garden documents and explores this remarkable Australian landscape and the sensibility that produced it. Ahead of the publication of Rogue in early 2020, The Planthunter spoke to Rick about his vision for Musk. “In designing Musk, I wanted to break new territory but stay within the profile of the Australian landscape – I just tipped...

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God in Reverse is a finalist in AGDA Awards and featured in Art Alamanac

Awards God in Reverse Reviews

<i>God in Reverse</i> is a finalist in AGDA Awards and featured in Art Alamanac

We are very happy to announce that God in Reverse, designed by Sean Hogan of Trampoline Design, is a finalist in the Australian Graphic Design Associations' 2019 awards. View the whole entry.   Australian art journal, Art Almanac has reviewed artist/architect Richard Goodwin's God in Reverse: Art, Architecture and Consciousness, admiring the book's ambition in combining imagination and research to create an “unorthodox monograph”. “Richard Goodwin’s preoccupation with the delineations between art, architecture and urbanism means that, to our delight, he does not walk the line.” “With innovative ideas and the, at times dizzying, asymmetry of its presentation, one cannot...

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The Breeze Block Book featured on Yellowtrace!

Reviews

<i>The Breeze Block Book</i> featured on Yellowtrace!

The Breeze Block Book has been featured on Yellowtrace, one of Australia's leading design commentators. ‘Delving into the history, vast functionality and revived uptake of one of Australia’s most iconic building materials, Brickworks Building Products presents The Breeze Block Book. The curated coffee table tome explores the past, present and future of the Breeze Block,’ writes Yellowtrace. ‘In today’s architectural climate, concerns about the environmental impact of air-conditioning and heating systems are seeing architects turn back toward simpler design solutions in creating ‘buildings that breathe’. Aided by 21st century digital and robotic design tools, complex new iterations of breeze block...

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Jeremy Till on God in Reverse: “a lifetime’s work of thinking to make and making to think.”

God in Reverse Reviews

Jeremy Till on <i>God in Reverse</i>: “a lifetime’s work of thinking to make and making to think.”

Jeremy Till, British architect and writer, and Head of Central Saint Martins, London, has offered some comments on Richard Goodwin's God in Reverse. “God in Reverse tracks a lifetime’s work of thinking to make and making to think. It is presented as a series of thought experiments – visual, material, intellectual – which ask ‘what if?’, where the ‘if’ is sometimes extreme but eventually lands in a set of spatial provocations. If Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities has Venice at its core, then God in Reverse has Sydney as its object of tough love, unravelling the stranglehold that financialised space has placed...

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